Games of the Year

Yes, Your Grace

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In this kingdom management RPG, petitioners will arrive in the throne room each turn to ask for your advice and assistance. Decide whether to help them with their problems, or to conserve resources for more important matters. Remember: supplies are limited, and not everyone has the kingdom’s best interests at heart... Listen to petitioners each turn and decide who needs your support. Aid your family with their personal problems and decide upon their fate. Hire Generals, Witches and Hunters to aid your efforts. Prepare for battle and make alliances by satisfying the whims of lords and kings. Follow the stories of the quirky and determined characters that visit your halls. Yes, Your Grace tells a tale of Davern, a medieval kingdom ruled by King Eryk. The game is set in a fictional world where monsters and arcane practices inspired by Slavic folklore are the order of the day. Villagers will ask for your help with various problems, from monsters attacking the village to a lack of places to relax and enjoy themselves. Some will bring humour to your throne room and some will present you with difficult choices. Your family is important too, and throughout your time as King, you will have to support them in their struggles. You will face lords with a variety of personalities; you will need their support in order to win an upcoming battle, but some may ask you to perform dirty deeds to cement the alliance. One thing is clear: It won’t be easy to keep everyone happy...
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

In this game you play as a king, who will have to face hardships.
Pros:
The overall management is fun.
some decision might cause very unexpected results.
The game is done with a sense of humor.
Cons.
The game has a very big bad side which isn't hard to notice at first. Although it seems you have decisions, some of major decisions are forced and ruin the replayability,
To sum up: Its a fun game that makes you sweat on some decisions, however has a very low replayabilty.

Review from Steam

What a pleasure this game was. I never would've expected I'd get such a kick out of it, but here I am, filled to the brim with enjoyment and overwhelmed with emotions.
At first glance I thought this game would be like a Papers, Please! or a Not Tonight knock-off, but oh boy wasn't I just so far from the truth. The only similarity I ever found is whether you agree or not to people's demands, but that is still quite different.
But anyways, coming back, I can't tell you how invested I got the more I played it, the story was really well made and you can actually somewhat feel what Eryk the King of Davern (you), goes through. And not to mention sometimes you'll actually scratch your head and really think over which action should you take in certain situation if you want to prevail and also not go bankrupt or make the people hate you and also keeping your family safe. This is what makes this game so immersive, besides the story and the events. It's amazing feeling like a king and also feeling the stress and burden of a king.
Now saying all of that, there's not to say this game is perfect, far from it actually. The fact that most of your actions or decision only decide minor outcomes and those outcomes don't even really matter in the end it's infuriating, really. There's around 2-3 actions/decision that from what I know change the outcome of the endings which is quite disappointing considering this is what this game is all about, and some of those actions or dialogues don't give you much options sometimes.
It's still a very good game and I'd recommend anyone because I definitely enjoyed it a whole lot and I bet a lot more people will, but I really would've wanted to see that your choices would matter a little bit more, even at the cost of the quality of the story, cas I feel this what the main centre of attention is but it's a bit lackluster in some situation.
Overall I really loved this game I will continue to play it so I can see the other endings as well. Super Awesome!

Review from Steam

It's very rare I make reviews for games, however Yes, Your Grace hasn't gotten the attention I think it deserves. For context, I went into this game completely blind; it was in a bundle with The Life and Suffering of Sir Brante, and Suzerain, which were both games I'd been interested in, so thought "why not".
I'd read no guides, seen no videos, and I've finished the only run I'll ever do in 7 hours.
The important bits first:
- How long to finish the game? * I beat the whole thing in almost exactly 7hrs.
- Is there replayability? * Depends; I'd say no once you've got an ending you're satisfied with unless achievement hunting.
- Is it worth the cost? * Ehhh... I'd say maybe. I really enjoyed it, but I can understand it won't be everyone's thing.
- Is the music fire? * The Music Is Fire.
Yes Your Grace, at its core, is a "choices matter" resource management game. With many people within your kingdom in need of your help, but war with an overwhelmingly powerful foe on the horizon, its your job to try and provide stability and security for yourself, your family, and your kingdom. To that end, the general storyline is set in stone - you will either fail or succeed. However the fates of individual characters, and how you arrive at your ending, are the bits that can be affected. I got what I would consider to be almost the perfect ending on my first go, but there were still plenty of times where I figured I was very close to losing outright.
Resource management is not too difficult, but you can still be caught out by poor choices - spend your gold on one village, you may not have enough for another, and if you give to someone undeserving expect to see no benefit at all; there's a loan system from the bank if you need help, but those weekly fees start to get real annoying; things like that. You're essentially trying to prepare for the worst at all times, but if you neglect any one area for too long then you're going to be in trouble regardless.
Criticisms of the game for me were the lack of transparency in some mechanics; inventory items have no description so it's hard to know what happens when you use them, or indeed when they can be used - know that items may have multiple occasions when they could be useful, but each one pretty much only does one thing. The "archives" menu too, which acts as your quest tracker, is sometimes missing important bits of information which can make it difficult to remember what exactly you need to do at certain points - the fact that you can't open it during dialogue is especially frustrating, and punishes heavily not playing the game in one sitting.
There are also some elements that can feel frustratingly forced upon you, but I feel it's the game trying to say "immerse yourself into the character of the king, don't approach it like you're a player who can just reload with no consequences". Forcing yourself not to reload can be difficult, but trust me when I say that most minor mistakes can be recovered from, and the game's best played when every decision feels tense - it forces you to pick choices that can feel immoral because you just can't guarantee that your greater objectives will be safe if you don't.
I don't want to spoil anything, but I'll say that overall my experience with this game was one of increasing stress and tension right up until the achievements popped up informing me of the final outcome; the rush of relief and joy that came from the positive conclusion of seven hours of careful management for a situation I never felt quite prepared for was enough to make me want to leave this review. Yes, Your Grace excellently captures that feeling of escalating tension, without ever making you feel quite hopeless enough to give up, nor quite comfortable enough to relax.

Review from Steam

A Brief Summary“Yes, Your Grace” is a simple resource management game set in a medieval fantasy setting. Keep the kingdom afloat week by week by balancing the treasury’s contents between the threats to the kingdom, king Eryk’s family, and the needs of the people. While there is much beyond the player’s control, the game does an exceptional job of framing its choices to enhance its stakes and story without feeling unfair. Quite good overall.
GameplayBasics
The kingdom of Davon is under threat and will need all the resources it can get to prepare. Gold and supplies are the core resources gained each week through taxes and shipments from other lords. These resources can then be spent on upkeep, specialists, and city projects, with the remainder being stored in the treasury. Lastly, approval will rise and fall as the player acts on or ignores the requests from the citizens, slightly influencing the amount of taxes claimed each week. Going negative on any of the three resources will result in the kingdom’s collapse while running low on gold and supplies will severely limit the player’s capacity to act in future weeks.
There will always be threats looming on the horizon with deadlines and goals for the coming weeks. If Eryk’s kingdom is to survive, it needs soldiers, supplies to feed them, and gold to prepare them for combat. While the citizen petitions can be hit or miss, progress towards the main objectives are both consistent and predictable, provided one can pay for them. The game is generally merciful with clear indications of shortages in the reports each week, though every bit helps as time runs out. It also bears mentioning that the game saves each week, allowing the player to course correct within reason in the unlikely event that the kingdom collapses entirely.
Petitioners
King Eryk listens to requests proposed by different petitioners from all walks of life. Farmers come to him asking for support when harvests fail or bandits attack. Villagers may come to ask for financial aid to repair and improve infrastructure while merchants drop by to peddle their wares. While it’s not easy to pin down the exact value of a petition prior to completing it, the overwhelming majority of them will produce something, while a rare few will yield great rewards. In addition to the common folk, nobles can be summoned to negotiate alliances to face the hardship to come. Notably, they tend to make clear requests with often substantial and transparent rewards.
Just about every problem can be solved by throwing resources at it. Bandit attack? The crown can pay for the repairs. Bad harvest? Some supplies can sustain them until the next. Of course, there isn’t enough to help everyone. Instead of paying for the solutions, the player can send a specialist out to help the petitioners. The general can handle the bandits, while the witch can heal the townsfolk. While specialists can be much cheaper than funding petitioners, they must be paid a week in advance with no indication as to their uses. Some tasks can only be completed by specialists while others cannot be completed by them at all. Regardless, the player lacks the resources to satisfy everyone and must determine which petitions are the most important and which should be left alone.
Uncertainty
While most make their petitions in good faith, not all do. For that matter, there is no way to reliably tell if someone is telling the truth or if they’ll take the money and run. That knowledge alone encourages players to think long and hard about whether certain claims are too good to be true. Beyond that, some well meaning requests don’t work out even when addressed. Couple that with the unreliable usefulness of specialists and just about every choice ultimately becomes a calculated risk. While it’s probably not realistic to detect every bad request, an attentive player can spot red flags and manage their resources appropriately.
FramingConsequences
The masterstroke of this game, in my eyes, are the ways that it obfuscates the consequences of the player’s actions. With what is effectively an unknowable binary system, the temptation to reset to the last autosave in response to negative outcomes could be significant. The first countermeasure is the offset between the funding of petitions and reporting of their results by a week or more, effectively bundling several choices together each week. Despite the uncertainty, the player will almost always get more things right than wrong, meaning that the aggregate value of each bundle will usually be positive. Finally, the actual consequences of these events play into the three main resources, meaning that negative results can always be compensated by past and future fortunes. No news is all bad, nor unrecoverable. All of this together makes for an experience that can gradually turn up the heat without burning the player by carefully manipulating their perception of the events that occur.
Choices
Given time, the weeks of petitions begin to wear on the player, distracting from the important details within the requests made by other lords and draining the resources needed to fund important projects. While there is a story behind each, the game has its way of getting the player to gradually disregard any of the emotional baggage tied to the petitions, instead pushing them to a more utilitarian perspective. City projects and personal interactions are not like that. Projects are clear cut in both costs and benefits, but require an effort over multiple weeks to fund. Personal interactions often incur their consequences immediately with what are often “priceless” values that cannot be easily translated back to resources. By changing the presentation of each choice, the game can control how the player will come to think of its challenges, allowing it to more effectively direct the player’s attention between the gameplay and narrative as needed.
StakesFamily
The game opens with Eryk playing with his children. Were it not for his responsibilities as the king, he would take time with them more often. What little time he can afford is often spent mediating the quarrels between his eldest daughters. The lack of a suitable heir weighs heavily on his mind, all while the forces gathering just beyond his realm’s borders threaten to take away the world he has built. How much can he afford to give his loved ones when their futures are at risk? Regardless of the circumstances, Eryk listens to his family with the same attention to detail as he gives to the various petitions. He listens closely to their troubles and teases out the details of their problems, though it’s no surprise that many of the solutions he can find and understand are material in nature.
Morality
Each piece of Eryk’s world can be sold away for a price. The favor of his people and the love of his family traded for the power needed to protect what matters most. Often the difference between right and wrong is the resources needed to do the right thing. At other times it’s the understanding that there may be more pressing matters that have yet to present themselves. The player is rarely questioned in their judgments, left to appraise the value of the material and human consequences of most events themselves. Much of the game’s challenge lies in surviving while making as few moral compromises as possible, whatever that may mean.
Conclusion“Yes, Your Grace” is a simple resource management game in which your resources control whether or not you can answer “yes” or “no” on the choices presented each week. While the gameplay may not be for everyone, I found the game to be exceptional through the framing of its choices, all without having any noteworthy issues.Follow our Curator page, Summit Reviews, to see more reviews regularly.

Review from Steam

Yes, Your Grace is a story based game about Kingdom Management, and it over-delivers in some ways that you may not expect, but under-delivers in some of its core tenants.
Pros:
-Very rich story, I was expecting more of a management sim, but the game is much more about following the central story and the relationships between the characters.
-Great characters; I really like the main family, the characters truly felt fleshed out in a wholesome way (or I guess negative way if you choose that route)
-I did enjoy the art design and color choices, really makes the game vibrant despite the bleaker circumstances
Cons:
-Your choices don't actually affect any of the key points of the story, unless you fail to meet the required conditions and get a game over. Your choices will affect the fate of the side characters but ultimately all of the main plot points will happen regardless of what you choose. What's the point of having choices if it doesn't affect the outcome? Also sours the replay-ability of the game.
-Management sim side is somewhat lacking. You can't know which of your 3 agents that you'll need in advance, same with resources. Feels somewhat arbitrary and management choices are few and not hugely impactful as long you as you focus on the main story conditions.
Overall, the story is pretty good, but the gameplay feels very secondary. By the second half of the game I was just repeating the same loop to progress the story. I'd say it's definitely worth one play-through, but the game does not deliver enough on the "choices matter" tag-line to really justify multiple play-throughs. I was excited to see if the story changed based on different choices and knowledge after my first run, but ultimately the story progresses the same way regardless, which is also takes away the impact and investment from the first run as I found out that many of the story events were not actually based on my choices but were going to happen regardless. I had a solid 4 hrs of invested playtime that I enjoyed, but anything more than that is diminishing returns.
Rating: 6/10

Review from Steam

This game is a joy to play, a largely narrative based RPG/Management type of game where you are running a kingdom with excellent writing, characters, and some solid branching

Review from Steam

My lesbian barbarian daughter and my other daughter who commands the loyalty of bears will long be with my elder god born manchild. A win for all.

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