Games of the Year

Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark

Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark Screenshot 1
Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark Screenshot 2
Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark Screenshot 3
Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark Screenshot 4
Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark Screenshot 5
0
1
Edit
Classic tactical combat in a beautiful, dangerous world. Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is a tactical RPG that follows in the footsteps of venerated genre greats such as Final Fantasy Tactics. ​Lead your squad of Arbiters through dozens of lush, hand-drawn maps. Customize your squadmates and set them on their path to greatness. With over 20 classes and 200 abilities, every squadmate is unique. Position your troops and choose a strategy that leads to victory!
Promote for 50G

Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

Fell Seal: Arbiter's Mark is a very good game with a fundamental flaw. If you're a fan of Final Fantasy Tactics or tactical rpgs like me, you will enjoy it A LOT - but something might gnaw on you until you're pissed. More on that below.
PROS
+ Deeply customizable character builds.
+ Tons of classes with themed skill sets & traits.
+ Combine 2 classes & get traits from other classes.
+ Synergize class combos or just go w/ a crazy build.
+ Stat growth differs for each class, more uniqueness.
+ You can upload your own character portraits.
+ Very tough (but long) battles if you play on hardest.
+ Lots of unique armor, weapons and accessories.
+ Interesting map levels, lots of verticality & flavor.
+ Quaint pixel style is clean, it grows on you.
+ Music is above average but limited.
CONS
- Too many difficulty settings. Keep choices minimal.
- Story attempts to be adult but dialogue is childish.
- I did not like any of the story characters.
- Animation of models and skills effects is choppy.
- Portrait art is not bad but it did not suit the game.
- Battles get too long w/ mob resurrection & healing.
- All actions are instant, reducing strategy depth.
- No line of sight! Shoot through walls & characters.
- Fundamental Flaw Incoming: 
The game encourages mastery of all classes for each character. When a character masters all the skills/traits of a class, they get a permanent bonus to their stats (+ evasion, + defense, + attack, etc). I don't mind playing some classes to max or partial to get a specific skill for one of my characters. But as a min-maxer, I felt compelled to master all classes for all characters in order to get the nice permanent bonuses. Sometimes I just want a character to roleplay as a kinght/templar, but now, I feel the need to run him as a scoundrel, reaver, wizard for several levels because I have partial ranks in those classes, might as well take him the master rank to get those permanent stat bonuses. 
It's like the devs made this robust and unique class customization system, but counters it with a 'must level all classes to be best' system.The devs should have removed the permanent stat bonus upon class mastery. This will allow players to play the builds and combinations they really want instead of incentivizing them to master all classes. I want to enjoy my characters in the themed builds I've made for them by mid-game, not wait until the very end of the game - if at all.
Without this fundamental flaw, it would be, for me, one of the greatest games out now. Despite this flaw, I still very much enjoyed Fell Seal. Otherwise I would have not played 189 hours of it in my first playthrough. It deserves a spot in a tactical rpg lover's library 100%!
A big thank you to my awesome friend, Daggoth, for gifting me this game. I love you!

Review from Steam

Some games aim to challenge our conception of what video games can be. Some games are happy to iterate on established genres. And a few games have an even narrower focus: using a single beloved video game as their inspiration to craft a sort of spiritual sequel. Fell Seal: Arbiter’s Mark is a tribute act to Final Fantasy Tactics, one of many to come out in the last few years.
It does a pretty great job at this, particularly when you consider that the principle design, programming, art, and writing was done by only two people. And if the character art isn’t as accomplished as Tactics, and the storytelling is more pedestrian, well, that just means that a small developer’s first game isn’t the equal of one of the greatest strategy RPGs of all time.
But it comes closer than it has any right to. The moment-to-moment gameplay is just as compelling as Tactics, featuring a wide array of different classes, varied encounters, and satisfying character progression. While it never approaches the political intrigue and moral ambiguity of its predecessor, the game has genuinely likable characters that grew on me the more I played.
Best of all, the game has a few novel ideas all its own. My favorite is that items aren’t single-use consumables, but rather replenish after every encounter, giving the player an array of tactical tools and discouraging hoarding behavior (which I normally succumb to in RPGs).
Fell’s Seal: Arbiter’s Mark hooked me for the vast majority of its running time; I started to run out of steam in the final 10%, but only after logging over 50 hours. Like its predecessor, the story starts to get a little silly/over-the-top towards the end, but nothing too egregious. Overall, it’s a charming tactical RPG, and I look forward to what the developer does next.

Review from Steam

☐ You forget what reality is
☐Beautiful (especially at vanilla unicorn xD)
☐ Good
☑ Decent
☐ Bad
☐ Don‘t look too long at it
☐ MS-DOS
---{ Gameplay }---
☐ Very good
☑Good
☐ It's just gameplay
☐ Mehh
☐ Watch paint dry instead
☐ Just don't
---{ Audio }---
☐ Eargasm
☐ Very good
☑ Good
☐ Not too bad
☐ Bad
☐ I'm now deaf
---{ Audience }---
☑ Kids
☑ Teens
☑ Adults
☑ Grandma
---{ PC Requirements }---
☐ Check if you can run paint
☐ Potato
☑ Decent
☐ Fast
☐ Rich boi
☐ Ask NASA if they have a spare computer
---{ Difficulty }---
☐ Just press 'W'
☐ Easy
☑ Easy to learn / Hard to master
☐ Significant brain usage
☐ Difficult
☐ Dark Souls
---{ Grind }---
☐ Nothing to grind
☐ Only if u care about leaderboards/ranks
☐ Isn't necessary to progress
☑ Average grind level
☐ Too much grind
☐ You'll need a second life for grinding
---{ Story }---
☐ No Story
☐ Some lore
☐ Average
☐ Good
☑ Lovely
☐ It'll replace your life
---{ Game Time }---
☐ Long enough for a cup of coffee
☐ Short
☑ Average
☐ Long
☐ To infinity and beyond
---{ Price }---
☐ It's free!
☑ Worth the price
☐ If it's on sale
☐ If u have some spare money left
☐ Not recommended
☐ You could also just burn your money
---{ Bugs }---
☐ Never heard of
☑ Minor bugs
☐ Can get annoying
☐ ARK: Survival Evolved
☐ The game itself is a big terrarium for bugs
---{ ? / 10 }---
☐ 1
☐ 2
☐ 3
☐ 4
☐ 5
☐ 6
☐ 7
☑ 8
☐ 9
☐ 10

Review from Steam

Pros:
- It scratches the Final Fantasy Tactics itch in many ways, and it's very faithful to the old game in most ways.
- The artwork reminds me of the original Dragon Age game, before EA bought Bioware and ruined the series. The art's good.
- The music is good, although repetitive. Recommendation: three music pieces per section of the game, minimum, and rotate them.
- The maps are good, and very well drawn (including the little animated animals that make the game more alive).
- The characters are well-done and memorable for the most part.
- The story is okay. Not very broad in sweep, just enough to keep the plot rolling. I would have like more backstory about the world itself and its history.
Cons:
Major bug - Even if you have a marina in all 5 guilds, if an enemy pushes you into water without flippers, you drown (instant death), which shouldn't be happening. Marinas let your character swim, so pushing them into water shouldn't drown them.
Design flaws:
- Each guild city should have the same layout for buildings, but they don't. Cities shouldn't be limited as to the number of guild buildings (and forget the grid, it's not necessary, just make the synergies pop up as you build them).
- The ever-advancing level ranges for most areas make it difficult to level characters you didn't level up regularly. Once you get beyond a certain level, the enemies can one-shot weak characters, and a difference of 5 levels makes characters useless in a fight. I finished the game at about level 70.
- Injuries are there solely to punish the player, and they suck. This forces you to put the Fortitude skill on all characters except the monsters that don't have it, and the lead characters who are better off with other skills (such as Smart Casting for Kyrie once she gets her unique class). You can get multiple injuries and that puts a character out for several fights (solution: fight in the 3 - 6 level area until the injuries go away).
- There are no boots that give a player +2 or +3 movement, so you can't take down a couple of monsters before they get enough MP to use their skills. However, some of the later monsters have an *** 8 MV *** stat. That's basically twice your max movement. It's a bit unfair. Not undoable, but still unfair.
- A lot of the fighting areas max out the range, even when all your characters are well under the top range. This is asking to lose your entire party. They have large battles (9 characters) late in the game, but it's not conducive to leveling characters.
- Most of the classes have skills belonging to other classes. It feels like a Dungeons and Dragons v4 or v5 grid game, and most of the skills and classes are worthless. I didn't bother maxing them all, 125 hours was enough for me. (NOTE: D&D v4 and v5 are horribly cut down versions of the great v3.0 / v3.5 D&D game, and while I like this game, the resemblance to D&D v4 and v5 is not a good thing.)
- The choice to use a running initiative system instead of a team-turn system ruins the FF Tactics nostalgia. I can't count the number of times I was just about to heal one of my guys, and one little CPU moron throws a rock at him and kills him, giving him an injury and making me waste character turns to resurrect and heal him (max out the Mender class for everyone as soon as possible, and most of your characters should carry Mender as the secondary class).
- Unlike FF Tactics, you CANNOT STEAL EQUIPMENT ITEMS, only consumables like potions, rocks and other near-worthless stuff - and you have no choice as to what you steal...it's random, and it sucks. Stealing is only useful at one specific time in the game, and you'll know when.
- Some story battles are unbalanced, such as the Kawa region battles. Over-level your characters, and bring your main characters with their strongest classes (Assassin, Samurai, Marked, Demon Knight, but not Anatomist - a lot of monsters are immune to Dark skills), it's the only way to get through the hard missions.
- The sheer number of debuffs (15 of them) makes you take Mender as a secondary class for all characters (for the Panacea spells that gets rid of them all). Later in the game, you can find and construct Amethyst Earrings, which prevent all debuffs...but you have to do a lot of monster hunting to get the one component to make them. You can't buy them, otherwise I would have grinded money to buy them for all my characters.
- Some skills punish the player further by allowing bonus damage on characters already inflicted with debuffs. Don't let debuffs go on.
- The obelisk puzzle solution is NOT intuitive. I needed to Google the answer to that puzzle.
- There is no way to set difficulty for arena matches, so bring only your best characters. The game loves maxing out the level range even if your party is nowhere near the upper end. Multiple beatdowns suck.
- The best region for leveling (most times) is Azure Fields, east of Centina. There are almost no obstacles and the land is flat (although the grass makes locating characters difficult).
- The most annoying design decision in the entire game, for me, is the LACK of camera rotation during battles. You can't see characters, chests, monsters or other things at times, unlike FF Tactics. Not just rotation, but the ability to tilt the map to see characters and monsters better. You'd think that this love letter to FF Tactics would have included the much-needed map rotation and tilt controls.
- You'd also think that being able to fly would allow you to also hover, but NOT in this game. Poor, illogical design decision.
- Whoever designed the Zotzit with the Immunity skill needs to be slapped. The creature is usually impossible to destroy within the time limits before it hits you with its overpowered final attack (usually killing a character) and flees. I deliberately tore down my entire first three guilds to get rid of the +Zotzit and +Kawa buildings - and they kept showing up all the time afterwards anyway.
- A horrible design decision was to force the player to tear down EVERY GUILD BUILDING in order to redo any guild building at all. You get refunded only a fraction of the IP price for all the buildings, so once you build them, it's best to stick with them. Don't build the +Zotzit or +Kawa buildings, you're missing out on better bonuses when you do so.
- Several of the weapons (like the mace and dagger) are useless.
- The game doesn't distinguish between worn items on your characters, so if you try to keep everything neat and orderly, when you change classes, it will sometimes substitute a shield for a helm - it's all based on the stats, not the logic. When you change classes, review your characters.
- When you change classes to a class, say, with the Fortitude skill, and you have Fortitude in one of your slots already, the skill gets yanked out of the slot and AUTOMATICALLY REPLACED. Again, check your characters whenever you change classes.
- The help files don't tell everything, such as the secondary class skills not leveling up during battles - using secondary class skills only counts toward leveling up the PRIMARY class.
- Missions are too vague. When you have a base 55% success rate, even with the buildings that raise the success level by 20%, you don't want to be trying to decipher the cryptic stuff ("bring a multi-talented male", or when track is highlighted). I succeeded in every guild job, but some of those were just impossible to figure out, and I just saved before taking each set of jobs.
- The game is really cash-poor. The more characters you have, the less of them you can afford to equip.
Overall rating:
Well worth the money spent, despite the frustration at times. I'm looking forward to a sequel, or a similar story using the same engine. I'd like to see massive battles once in a while, too (like 16 vs. 16). Put these out every year, and you'll make a lot of money. It's a good game.

Review from Steam

This is one of these games that I'm just really glad I played, and I can't recommend it enough if you're looking to scratch that Final Fantasy Tactics itch.
It's fun, with an entertaining story and a wide cast of characters. Gameplay, being a turn-based tactics game, is pretty straightforward but engaging. Your characters can have a main class and sub-class, and can equip various skills to let you customize how you want your units to be. I specially liked that I could usually deploy 6 units and sometimes up to 9, so I could put into play some of the benched characters (and whew did I have a lot of those).
Music is really nice but gets a bit repetitive after a while, and the artstyle is really neat. I have to say though, I'm not a fan of the portraits (they're good, but they feel kinda out of place. Of course, this is just my opinion and it didn't take away from my experience playing it).
Overall it's really enjoyable, and a nice tactics game that feels just in the right place between FFT and more overgrindy games like Disgaea! Can't wait to see more from the devs, as they put a lot of love into this game.

Review from Steam

• FinalFantasyTactics-like
• Huge number of classes and skills
• Tons of combinations
• Able to import custom character portraits
• Easy to modify the game's settings file as needed

Review from Steam

They talk way too much in this game and the writing is just not good. Recently Neon White and with a different tenor Octopath Traveler had gotten flak for their writing and while both tread in (different) stereotypes both work as (different) fairy tales. This is a coming of age soap opera about friendship. Think if LotR was written for the youth program of 90s TV. All that ever happens is characters being dutiful and other characters being worried. It doesn't work because the reason to involved is never established and is substituted by the same characters spooling off their tropes.
The rest of the game is good though. It has a bit too many options for my taste so that by the time you get to grips with how the differences make a difference, half the game is over. The encounter design is excellent, the AI is real devious. I had a gruesome round of a match because an enemy ranged unit kept silencing my one healer almost all through the fight. Revive II seems broken tho, as long as your healer + 1 doesnt die, you can keep getting your bros and sis's back. (Possibly it is designed to be broken to give, as dying gives you some long term detriment, so maybe Revive IIs there for noobs like me).
Get this game if you like tactics, even if you don't have fond memories of FF tactics. It's just good as a tactics game -- mainly for the AI and encounter design.

X
Age Verification
To be able to see content under adult tag.
Confirm