Games of the Year

Everything

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Everything is an interactive experience where everything you see is a thing you can be, from animals to planets to galaxies and beyond. Travel between outer and inner space, and explore a vast, interconnected universe of things without enforced goals, scores, or tasks to complete. Everything is a procedural, AI-driven simulation of the systems of nature, seen from the points of view of everything in the universe. Learn to change what you are to create worlds within worlds within worlds, or let go any time to allow Everything to take over and produce a never ending documentary about the world you live in. Narrated by the inspiring philosophy of Alan Watts, and featuring a rich score from composer Ben Lukas Boysen, Everything will give you a new perspective on life.
Promote for 50G

Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

I had to laugh at the negative review by @ccwscott who said "When you play as any creature in the game the mechanics are identical; all you can do is roll around and look at things. The only thing that changes is the model that you're moving around and the environment you see. Playing as a whale or a planet is the same except for the environment that you're in."
Yes Scott, that's the point... That's the WHOLE FREAKING POINT. We are ALL the same. No matter what you are, no matter your scale. As a famous person once wrote "I am I, just as an alien thinks of itself as I, so do I think of myself as I. We are all the same, you see. We're all in a dance. The cow dance, the flower dance. We're all in a dance.. The universe is one giant Dance... It's all Jazz..."
This simulation (I hesitate to say game) is all about experiencing things from different perspectives. You can be a tree watching a herd of buffalo trudge by, or a bacteria, a quark or even an abstract concept. You can even be the whole game itself. You can call a flock of your brethren together, 'dance', and make more (procreate) copies of yourselves... You grow the dance, and in so doing, call to each other and enrich the world. Unlike Scott's review you can absolutely interact with other creatures and objects, both of your own 'species' and others...
But, if the point of the game is to show that we're all connected, all the same, does Everything do a good job of conveying it? Well.. Mostly. The identicalness of movements, of dancing, of interactions can be perplexing and ridiculous at first... But once you start to truly immerse yourself in the thoughts of the inhabitants, and start to seek out the wisdom of the world (told through Alan Watt's lectures), you start to see things from a philosophical perspective: Intelligent, self-introspective systems would, of course, have a sense of self, and that sense of self is the same as everyone else's sense of self. The core tenet is that the whole universe is connected, and that although we are a self-aware entity, there is nothing to say we're not just one small part of a larger self-aware entity.
The point where the analogy breaks is when you go to bacteria-sized. It's easy to think of a cat or dog having a sense of self, but frogs, fish, bacteria, pollen, DNA, sand.. etc... At this point, you just have to shift brain into neutral and go with the flow of it.
Everything is amazing for the sheer number of places you can go. Although the "biomes" are limited, there's still a huge number of them, and while some are similar, just colour-changed versions of other biomes, they all have different things in them, from the bizarrely traditional African continent filled with lions, giraffes, rocks and Acacia trees, to the psychadelic planet of the sentient kitchen appliances...
Everything does have a central message, and if you relax, enjoy it, and soak up the ambiance, it's easy to see things from a hugely different perspective. But, before you do, take an unholy amount of LSD, it'll be FAR more enjoyable! ;-)

Review from Steam

I dropped lsd and had many existential thoughts while playing this and would end up just watching the funny animations on autopilot

Review from Steam

I've played enough to know that this game is weird, but enjoyable to me.
Of course, YMMV.
If you are really into the philosophy of Alan Watts- just go online and look up his lectures and listen to them.
If you aren't into the philosophy of Alan Watts- welp- this game will likely do nothing but confuse you or tick you off.
The graphics are fairly basic on most levels- stylized and sometimes muddy. On other levels they are bright, colorful, flashy and stunning.
There are flashing lights, frantic movements, and often quick changes in color and brightness that may trigger seizure disorders- be aware of this. My daughter has epilepsy- she cannot be in the room while I am playing due to her absence seizures being light and pattern sensitive.
If you are into exploration and are just looking for something to kill time, explore extensively, looking for new things, new places, new interactions- the game is good for that.
If you are an achievement hunter or completionist- yes, you can likely get all of them- but not quickly or easily, and likely not without following multiple guides, written or video guides. You'll probably hate the process, because it is not terribly clear or easy to fathom.
If you like Mountain, you'll probably like this one too. If you hated mountain, you'll probably hate this one too.
It is trippy, and a gummie or two doesn't hurt, lol.
IMHO- it's best not to try to get too seriously invested in the philosophical elements presented in the game. Again, if you want to explore Alan Watts' philosophy- go find his lectures and read or listen to them onlie somewhere., so they aren't broken up into weird little unrelated bits and pieces.
A good time-water for people who like walking simulators where you don;t walk at all, but roll, slide, swim, fly, and spin around, through various weird, fictional locations and settings. But not a game to take too seriously.
I'll keep playing, maybe longer than I played Mountain. Then again, the game may begin to annoy or bore me like Mountain did, and I may just shelve it for years. Hard to say, but for $3, I've already gotten my money's worth.

Review from Steam

Everything isn't your average video game, so don't expect that. Great if you're stuck inside during a trip.

Review from Steam

This game introduced me to Alan Watts. For that I am grateful.

Review from Steam

On Steam deck there are UI elements that don't render (eye, up/down transform arrows, thought bubbles)

Review from Steam

Now I know Everything

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