Battlefleet Gothic: Armada 2 Screenshot 1
Battlefleet Gothic: Armada 2 Screenshot 2
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Battlefleet Gothic: Armada 2 Screenshot 4
Battlefleet Gothic: Armada 2 Screenshot 5
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Battlefleet Gothic: Armada 2

Battlefleet Gothic: Armada 2 is the full-blown, highly ambitious sequel to the original game, bringing richer content, and bigger, more impressive fleets, ships, and strategies to the space battles of Warhammer 40,000’s dark future.
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

I've played 90 hours of this game, and much of that I've enjoyed, so I sort of have to give it a thumbs up overall. But my time with it has ended in frustration -- I just can't do it any more and have to quit before I can see the end. The longer you play, the more glaring the huge list of terrible design decisions and technical issues start to pile up, until you just can't ignore them any more. There's still a lot of fun to be had, but anyone going in should know about the problems that run really, really deep throughout the game.
1. The campaign is an absolute slog. It's a 30 hour game stretched out for potentially 100+ hours. Yes, you can sort of tackle objectives at your own pace and you can skip side objectives if you want. I've heard of people finishing it much quicker, but it's very easy to get into a situation where you're fighting defensively and making any sort of main quest progress becomes incredibly slow and drawn out while you fight 3-4 defensive battles at the end of every turn.
In an utterly bizarre design choice that hugely multiplies this problem, your faction leader must be present for *any* battle that ties to a key mission objective. That means that you can only tackle one objective at a time, and objectives might be scattered on opposite sides of the world map. It make take five turns to move your leader to the next objective. Each of those turns might bring another 3-4 defensive battles. So potentially 20 cookie-cutter battles of no consequence just while you wait for your fleets to be in the right position to move the story forward.
2. There is no way to save the game between end-of-turn defensive battles. That means, on clicking 'end turn' you might be locked in for anywhere between twenty minutes to an hour and a half. If something comes up and you want to stop playing? Tough. It means that, before clicking end turn you have to scour the map to figure out how many defensive battles to expect and then do the maths to figure out if you have enough spare time to actually see it through. When you might have four battles against 3,000 point enemy fleets, those battles can easily stretch to half an hour because you'll be playing in slow-mo and very carefully choreographing your own ships. It's just an abysmal decision in terms of quality of life.
3. AI is bad across the board. The optimal strategy for every single battle is to find a nice big gas cloud, set your ships up in it and wait for the enemy to run at you while you slaughter them at range with your broadsides. The AI will be very happy to oblige and will do nothing to counter the strategy.
4. The terrible AI makes fighting against Tyranids soul destroying. They are completely uninteresting and a real slog to fight against. They just run at you. If they get close they'll probably one-shot your smaller ships with their boarding actions. You will be fighting against Tyranids a hell of a lot so the fact that they are not interesting to engage with at all is a big problem.
5. Like the AI, many of the game's systems are utterly half-baked. After the first 10 turns, you'll probably never have to worry about the economy again because you'll have more money that you can ever spend. Map features like defence platforms and space stations are meaningless because the enemy AI will not use them to its advantage -- you can just stay away from them until you've defeated the enemy fleet and then go and kill them from out of range afterwards. Map features like solar storms, plasma storms, radiation storms, whatever else, do nothing to make battles different or interesting and are mostly just an inconvenient irritation. Because the bad AI doesn't know how to deal with them, they're more of a threat to the enemy than the player.
6. Parts of the UI are horribly thought out. E.g. in the screen where you choose which ships to deploy to a given battle, you cannot see the individual ship loadouts. So, say you want to make sure you have a good balance of aircraft carriers and heavy gunships, unless you know by heart which ship types carry which weapons, you can't tell from this screen. Likewise, the gimmicky battle modifiers (solar storms, radiation storms, etc.) appear but there is no prompt to remind you what they do. So you'd better remember whether a solar storm means you should stay in the gas clouds or avoid them, because the game will give you no info.
7. The game runs really badly, even on a very modern gaming PC. When I click to open the menu to build new ships, the game hangs for anywhere between 5 and 10 seconds before showing the screen. Pressing the alt button to show the gas clouds and other map features causes the game to hang for a couple of seconds. Alt-tabbing out of the game has a significant chance of crashing the game. Just about everything you do seems to make it hang.
8. Unit pathfinding is regularly bad. Ships can get stuck on each other and refuse to move until you manually micromanage them away from each other. Occasionally they glitch out on each other in a way that makes them blow up.
9. Basic features you'd expect from a modern RTS are missing. There are no formation options for your units. As far as I've found there is no shortcut for selecting units of a specific type. It makes the iniital set-up of each battle annoying. You never need to adapt your starting approach depending on the scenario, so it's literally just doing the same thing every single time.
After all that ranting, it seems bizarre that this is a positive review. This game got in my head in a way that I find myself thinking about it constantly while not playing it. That's a testament to how satisfying the very core of the ship combat is when it works. But my god it's buried in a package that makes so, so many idiotic missteps that I can't persevere with it any longer.

Review from Steam

ram your traitor cousins
ram your toaster-"enthusiast" cousins
ram your armoured cousins
ram space elves
ram bdsm space elves
ram space pirates
ram ancient egytian aliens
ram blue space communists
do not ram the british fungi
do not ram the personification of the term "nom"
8 Brace for Impact stances out of 10

Review from Steam

I'm not sure why the game has such mixed reviews. It sets out to replicate battlefleet gothic, and it does that pretty well. It's currently retailing at $25, and that's probably a good spot for it. It's not great enough to be super interesting to someone not into warhammer, but would be worth buying on sale if you want a sort of squad based spaceship tactical game. Mostly because I just don't know of another, better game that does that.
Basically, it plays like the Total War series - it's not a leap to assume it draws a lot of inspiration from there. You have a very light strategic layer, where you upgrade planets (in a linear way, it's not a 4x in which you pick what the planets do), build ships, and move your fleets. It's very simple and could have been pulled from a casual mobile game, but it works well enough and gives you a little incentive to strategize. This portion is turn based. There isn't really a ton to look at, and I actually don't like the UI much, though I'll admit it's perfectly functional. I think the music is quite good, and goes with the setting.
The combat is then fought in instanced, real time battles. You will generally control 8-6 ships. Though you could take larger fleets of smaller ships, the game discourages this by making larger ships generally better. This is well done as the combat itself is actually somewhat tactically involved, and based very heavily on the use of special abilities. I wouldn't say this is anything revolutionary, but it's functional. The sound and visuals are pretty solid - the impactful "whump" of a cannon shell hitting home is great. The battles can feel quite long, especially when the fight is a safe, but sloggy one, but generally last under 20 minutes according to the timer. I found that after I started to be able to guess which ones I would be able to safely autoresolve, I found that the fights I did bother doing tended to be much more tense and enjoyable.
In between moving things around on the map and fighting battles is really the most bleh part of the game. On the easier difficulties, where most people will play, you end up ending your turn over and over and doing nothing. The game is on a timer, so you can't just sit and build up your forces, but the timer is set based on *objectives* rather than an overall goal. This means you will capture a system, then wait for 10 turns, *then* complete the objective in the system. If the next objective happens to be in your now captured system, you're going to generally end up clicking through closer to 30-40 turns, because you don't have anything else to do except collect resources. And you do want to do it - if you zip through the early parts of the game without building up, you'll get stomped in the later part. The timer doesn't really create any urgency, and ends up feeling like it actually slows the game down and forces a specific pacing on the player.
You can see that the developers did try to deal with this issue, as some parts of the game flow well and get around this, but of my twelve or so actual hours of play time (I accidentally left the game on), I'd say at least two or three hours of that time were just sitting around, clicking, double checking everything, and then clicking.
They also tried to break it up by having enemies attack you at random, but by the time this starts happening, you'll be built up enough that you can generally autoresolve your fights.
I'd say it's the most glaring flaw in the game. Otherwise, I'd generally say that, while it's not a really super amazing, unique game, it's a decent, solid entry into the Warhammer franchise. As with virtually any warhammer game, it's "ok, for the most part" and feels like a game released ten years before it actually was - nothing in it is really new, and while it's not badly done, it's not super well done either. So, for me, it's a decent recommendation if you're a franchise fan. If you arent, it's a solid "maybe, if you like the spaceship combat thing".

Review from Steam

Brothers, Do not believe these heretics that have "negative views" of the Imperial Navy. Admiral Spire requires your immediate assistance in purging the galaxy of ALL XENOS FILTH. If you find yourself with fire all around you, your crew mostly dead because of xenos boarding actions, remember brother, YOUR SHIP IS STILL A WEAPON! COAX YOUR SHIPS MACHINE SPIRIT TO POUR OUT THE LAST OF ITS ENERGIES IN A CHARGE THAT WILL MAKE THE EMPEROR PROUD! USE YOUR SHIP AS A BATTERING RAM TO BREAK DOWN THE DOORS OF HERESY AND PURGE ALL THE FILTH FROM THE EMPERORS SIGHT. The Emperor protects and the Emperor knows you.
The inquisition will be launching an investigation into these... Heretical witches who do not have faith.
Seriously though, if you are a true Guardsman or Astartes or Sister... Its worth it.
A: 10
V: 10
Make your choice and become Spire, Lord High Admiral of the Imperial Fleet or if that doesnt tickle your fancy, choose to play a heretical xenos from different heresies, Necrontier or Tyranid and dominate the galaxy while devouring each world slowly OR become the GREATEST ENEMY THE IMPERIUM HAS EVER FOUGHT... The True foe... Become an Admiral in Abaddons crusade.. and do heretical things.. Choose which god to follow from the vile creations of Nurgle to the blood hungry followers of Khorne!
The galaxy's fate is in your hands, Brother. Choose wisely.
Its fun

Review from Steam

It's a naval combat game that plays like a moba. This is not Homeworld. The map is 2d and winning combat is all about using your ships' hotbar of special powers. It can be a lot to manage. I think gameplay is based on world of warships. It works ok but you won't like it if you hate micro as the most powerful ship abilities are hard to use skillshots and you'll have to manage that for about 6-10 ships.
The graphic demands are intense, probably the most of any game I have. My computer can do Witcher 3 pretty well but it struggles with this even on the lowest settings. Crashes during story missions are frequent.
Probably a good start point for somebody unfamiliar with 40k because there are a lot of cutscenes that explain the premise of the setting.
Something that I really appreciate about the game is that it doesn't flanderize Imperium as corrupt and retardedly zealous like some other 40k media does. The characters are portrayed as brave, competent, and self-sacrificing (at least so far). How often do you see that in any media anymore?

Review from Steam

It took me 200 hours of gameplay to realize i could remove enemy minefields

Review from Steam

It is a mistery to me that the developers would abandon such a great and well made game.
I was really looking forward to an Eldar or Tau campaign, but I guess it will never happen now.