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We. The Revolution

We. The Revolution is a unique game with a singular art style set in the blood-soaked and paranoid world of the French Revolution, where often you could not tell a friend from an enemy. As a judge of the Revolutionary Tribunal, you will have to trudge through this setting passing sentences, playing a dangerous political game, and doing everything in your power to not to be guillotined as an enemy of revolution. The plot of We. The Revolution will put you in morally ambiguous situations in which there are no obvious solutions, and the decisions you made are never unambiguous. The power over human life and death is a heavy burden, responsibility and strength that can affect the fate of the revolution. keep that in mind each time when passing sentence in the courtroom, while assigning tasks to your agents, giving speeches, and weaving political intrigue behind the scenes.
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

Pros.:
- The aesthetics continue the traditions of "This is the police." I quite like them.
- No bugs and glitches.
- Introduction of the history of French Revolution for the broader audience who has no idea about it.
- Mechanics of acquital or executions to balance the factions.
Cons.:
- The story is a very simplified version of what was really happening. The game operates different personalities and also refers to different political clubs who fought to benefit from the Revolution. However, the game does not explain anything about it. It is very brief. For the person who never heard of them these are just words in the flood of terms. That is no good since the educational aspect is kind of wasted. Better to make a small term library in the Hierarchy section.
- The story about the miraculous brother is garbage. He manipulated everything being just a hobo after the war. Never convincing. I understand they used the same idea as Monte Cristo, but the level of details and development is far, far from the perfection.
- The behavior of Fidele's wife is awful. That character is so dumb and wasted. I feel like some of the developers don't really like women because there were many characters who exploit the worst from women (the lady who was killing infants, prostitutes, maids covering rapes and so on). Yes, the times of revolutions are not easy. Yes, men are also shown as brutal and warmongering, but I don't understand why they should have ruined the whole family story of Fidele to emphasize his struggle and suffering? There are so many ways.
- I think the "war" part of the game is a waste. I had been able to maintain order in all sections until the game started severely cheating on the invasion forces tactics (same cheating in dice game). The invasion from different sides, inability to use barricades if you control ALL the sections, inability to have more than one special agent. So, the game forces the player to give away the sections, forces to lose and shrink to only one district. There could be more varieties in this strategic element but they did not develop it well enough.
- Some of the report questions and answers are awful. Killing a judge is an Anti-Revolutionary act because the judge represent the justice of the Revolution. Though, it is NOT so according to the report of Fedele wife's crime. There are many cases like that.
The game is worth playing. But the game narrative becomes a failure at some point and the potential is kind of wasted.

Review from Steam

You play as a judge at the French Revolution. The game is not recommended, if you want to serve justice to your best abilities. My first play-through lasted for merely 4 days, before I got brutally murdered on my way home. On my second attempt I didn't even consider the truth, just made the decisions which pleased the most people. That way I made it to the end easily. Apart from this I enjoyed the game and recommend it for those, who like history and mini-games.

Review from Steam

This game places you, as the title says, as a judge of the revolutionary tribunal during the ascendency of Robespierre and through the Reign of Terror. At this, it does a pretty good job. I enjoyed the trials, the game accurately represented Robespierre's elimination of prison sentences with all crimes simply carrying the death penalty. (Yes this actually happened, Robespierre would make Mao and his anti-rightist campaign blush). Forcing you to (sometimes) consider the moral implication of sending someone to the guillotine for assaulting their wife's lover or stealing chickens because they were starving. However, that was generally not in the back of my mind as I was playing the game, and here's why.
The political system from the get go makes you realize that you need to placate the different factions and they expect you to enact a certian verdict. Meaning that to survive, you're not always acting as a gaurdian of justice, but rather tipping the scales to save your own skin. I thought that was an amazing idea, because it shows you first hand why corruption brought down the First Republic, and other nations such as the Soviet Union. Which is, 'If I actually do my job instead of currying political favor and placating my superiors they will kill me'. There's also a more complex intrigue system tied to the game that allows you to (through extremely questionable means) dispose of your enemies. You also have to manage control over Paris and Family Relations, but I found those mechanics of the game to be only somewhat impactful and easy to manage.
At the end there is a twist, and it pidgeonholes you into a conflict that is somewhat* ahistorical and other events of dubious historicity. Another odd anachronism is Marat dying *after* Robespierre which imo shouldn't have been in the game because it was an unecessary anachronism that didn't really add any moral questions or relevant issues into the plot. Overall, I think the ending, despite being an extremely odd way of potraying events when for all but one of them there is a literal historical event that fits in perfectly for what message they were trying to convey in the last Act of the game anyways. It also annoys me that the game, after pitting you in a survival situation where politics is a blood sport and your family is clearly endangered, begins to morality-preach to me about sending a bunch of people to their death when the reality of the situation is, if you don't do that, you die.
Overall though, I reccomend this game and had a lot of fun with it, even though I though the ending was to me clunky and didn't fit in with the rest of the game. The actual rest of the game itself and the trials are amazing, the political system is fun, and the game has important lessons to teach about politics, the dangers of radicalism, and the corruption of the judiciary. Buy this game and play it, especially if it's on sale.

Review from Steam

good

Review from Steam

NOT TRASH.
• Curating page
• Discord server
In We. The Revolution, we embody the judge, Alexis Fidèle, in charge of administrating justice during the period of Terror in the French Revolution. He is presented in all his facets with his drinking, gambling, family problems but also his desires to acquire more power and he achieves this by eliminating political opponents on his way.
I personally had a lot of fun playing the game and to see the story of the main character the history of France develop. We. The Revolution is not very complex and you will only need your mouse to play. As a matter of fact, in the Courthouse, it's just a matter of reading the testimonies and drawing the logical links between the different elements by asking the right questions to the accused.
The opinion of the Jury plays an important role but it is up to you to decide whether to release the accused, send them to prison or put them under the guillotine. The challenge resides, at least at the beginning, in the idea of balancing the influence of the different factions present in the game: the people, the revolutionaries, later on the aristocracy, while maintaining good relations with the family and maintaining decorum in the court.
The game splits into three distinct acts each with its own set of plots and each bringing a new element of gameplay. Indeed, you will even be able to command and organize armed militias fighting fierce battles for the control of Paris. The game revolves around your decisions and while it's unclear if most of them play a significant part or not in the final plot, it certainly feels as if you are having some control over the story. Over time, you will get the ability to start dialogues of persuasion ending in positive or negative results depending on the actions you are currently undertaking. Sadly, more often than not it is more a matter of chance and guessing the proper thing than using your brain.
Without being graphically spectacular, the design is coherent and has remained so throughout the game, the important moments during the cutscenes are also featuring voice which makes the story more interesting. However, there comes a time when swinging the balance between the faction no longer serves any purpose and giving speeches before the guillotine becomes more boring than anything else. What at first was frankly interesting and new becomes worn out and boring towards the middle-end of the adventure.
However, the atmosphere of the game is great, it is dramatic and the misery of the population is felt at all times. Historically faithful to what I know of the Revolution, the key characters are present and play an important role as you would expect it. The story kept me engaged throughout my run and dealing with the various intrigues was certainly enjoyable. There is some form of replayability to the game, but I don't know if I could find the strength to go through another run.
Trials are all or almost the same, a record of the actions, you make connections between the record and what might have happened, you ask questions to the accused, fill out a form, sign and more often than not, the accused finds himself guillotined.
The game has a lifespan of about ten hours and at a more than respectable pricetag (5$), it would be stupid to deprive yourself of it.
Finally, We. The Revolution is an interesting, affordable, intelligent game which offers interesting gameplay between Papers Please and a History lesson on the Revolution which the more time passes, the darker it becomes and the glimmers of hope appears to thin out. This game was very pleasant, even if it became a bit boring at times, it is highly recommended.

Review from Steam

Let it be known til the day i die, i absolutely adore this game , it's art, it's gameplay. This is a hidden gem 100%, i bless the day i found it. Worth every single penny.

Review from Steam

Thank you K3vlar for such a beautiful gift! * Dziękuję K3vlar za tak piękny prezent!
I had never heard of this game before being gifted it. But I dived in and gave it go. And I am happy to say that it is very enjoyable. The artwork is beautiful, the voice overs well done and the story intriguing. Mind you I am still early into the game.
You play as a judge during the French Revolution. You pass sentences (even death), play the political games, and try to not lose your own head in the end. * I can probably predict from now that I will as I am learning fast that I am not the most compassionate judge to grace a courtroom.
I will edit my review as I progress more into the game but so far I am about an hour and a half in and really enjoying the experience. It is so different and refreshing from most of the games I play. So hats off to the friend who gifted me this game (he knows me better than I thought)! ⚖️