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The Turing Test

The Turing Test is a challenging first-person puzzle game set on Jupiter’s moon, Europa. You are Ava Turing, an engineer for the International Space Agency (ISA) sent to discover the cause behind the disappearance of the ground crew stationed there. Upon arrival a series of puzzles awaits you – tests which, according to the station’s AI, Tom, can only be solved by a human. These puzzles have apparently been set by the missing ground crew – but why have they created them and what are they hiding from? In an evolving story based on mankind’s instinctual need to explore, protect and survive, you’ll delve deeper into Europa’s ice crusted-core and discover that the lines between man and machine begin to blur. Armed with the Energy Manipulation Tool (EMT), solve puzzles to open the way forward as you learn the true cost of human morality.
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

First person puzzler set in a sci-fi story on Europa, one of Jupiter's moons with favourable conditions for human life.
Story
You play as Eva, a space engineer who just arrived at Europa's station. For some reason, the crew has abandoned the station, and you are alone with the station's AI Tom. The station is shielded with The Turing Test, a series of tests that can only be solved by humans. This in order to prevent AI control outside the station.
It's clear that either the crew abandoned the station, or that Tom shut them out. Either way, Tom needs you to solve The Turing Test, and you need to find out what happened.
The Turing Test
TTT consists of puzzles with replaceable power orbs. The orbs can power doors, elevators, actuators, or create paths for you to walk across. You carry a handgun that can store up to three orbs. They last collected orb has to be fired first, and that matters because there are different orbs. Blue orbs create constant power, while green and purple give intermittent power opposite of each other. And red orbs give power for a short time.
Thoughts
Gameplay
The first comparison my mind makes, is 'something like portal!', but such a comparison is a bit unfair since I regard Portal as masterpiece. And indeed, the puzzles never get very complicated. This game doesn't have the element of momentum, so it has one dimension less, this is much more a 'normal' game. Nevertheless I liked it a lot! The game looks good, and rooms have a nice atmosphere. The orb mechanic is simple, but works well. The fact that it's very clear where orbs go makes it easy.
Story
I just love good AI morality stories! Combined with a space setting, and I am hooked from the first minute! Sure, it's a subject that has many many tales written about it, but I can't be saturated with them! This particular story has some unique elements, so it's not a simple mixture of 2001: a space odyssey, Terminator, Bladerunner, Star Trek TNG, and many more. The concept of TTT reminds me of the Voight-Kampff test in Bladerunner.
I don't quite understand that AI can't solve the puzzles in this game, but I can live with that. A serious flaw of the game is that a big part of the story is hidden inside the optional rooms. The optional rooms push the limits, and the very first one I still don't understand. Hiding key parts of the story in there is just bad in my opinion.
I enjoyed TTT greatly. Slightly below a classic for me!
83/100
More reviews at Omnivore Gamer, games that are easy to control (for handicapped gamers).

Review from Steam

In short, this is a small portal-like puzzle game - it has a similar level and visual design, similar character design, similar puzzle design.
Compared to Portal 1, the narrative part is the one that outstands this game. I cannot say that plot in "The Turing Test" is particularly deep nor that the game has a lot of it, but the presence is much stronger here than in Portal. In Portal 1 it was more like we just were trying to get out of the ASHPD and...this was actually it, the whole plot. In the case of "The Turing Test" the deal is a little bit more complicated.
Another thing that begs the comparison is Tom. Tom is a local AI, as the GLaDOS in Portal, and he is a keeper of Europa research station and also one of 2 main plot drivers in this game. While he tends to ask interesting questions about morality, humanity, the value of life of the one, etc, in my opinion, he lacks charisma. When you listen to him, it feels more like the lecturer teaches his student, even despite Ava - the protagonist of this game, in the constant dialogue with him. I had a feeling that authors wanted to tell you their own mind more than to make you think about it yourself. Another drawback is that sometimes intellectual inequality between Ava and Tom is so big that the main character just feels to be stupid with her weak arguments against the strong and actually rational position of Tom (ofc he will be rational - he is an AI, lol). I feel that it would be better for the game to just cut out some parts of dialogues to allow the player to think about the topic on his own instead of frustrating him with the parade of stupidity.
Okay, what with the puzzles? The game consists of 7 chapters 10 sectors each and also of 7 optional sectors. Core mechanic, in short, relies upon power on and shut down a set of mechanisms with different kinds of power orbs. Of course, it's a little bit more complex than just that but I don't want to spoiler puzzles in this review. I think they won't make any trouble to experienced puzzle-solvers, especially those who complete games like Portal 1, 2, Q.U.B.E 1,2 or Talos Principle. The game has a quite limited set of mechanics with some kind of overhaul near to the second half of the game, which, actually makes the game easier. All that results in that the difficulty curve of the game is like a set of hills - it grows for the whole first half of the game up to peak at the end of it and at the second half it starts to slowly go down with some ups for 1 or 2 sectors in the chapter. The complexity curve of the puzzles, on the contrary, throughout the whole game just grows up. At the end of several sectors, I just stood up to appreciate the beauty of the mechanisms which game designers made me build. In short, I would say puzzles here are challenging enough, with some exception, to keep you busy but not enough to frustrate the player
As a sum of facts and feelings, I would want to recommend this game to the people who are looking for the games like Portal - this one is short, cheap, and is able to ask good questions about values common to all mankind. If you advanced puzzle-solver - I would not recommend this game to you, because it will be just too easy, and the plot itself is not worth of your time

Review from Steam

This is a nice puzzle game, not the best, nor the worst.
Can be short, and has the feeling of a tech demo.
-> The Bad: (most are pet peeves)
There isn't a proper tutorial and the mechanics can be difficult to figure up without a guide.
When listening to audio-logs there are no subtitles (even with subtitles on) and the sound level is very low. Must be played with headphones or it's difficult to make out what is being said.
If you play the game, disregard the prompt to move things with the mouse (while pressing E), use the WASD keys instead, it`s way more responsive (this was my worst pet peeve).
Has very few visual options toggles, those lens flares can be annoying.
-> The Good:
Very good visuals.
Interesting story.
Challenging puzzles.
Interesting game mechanics.

Review from Steam

I found "The Turing Test" enjoyable and challenging.
I would describe it as a "puzzle room" game that sometimes forces you to think outside the box.
There are 7 chapters and one progresses through 70 areas (sectors) by solving a puzzle (10 puzzle rooms for each chapter): figure out how to open the door to advance to the next area. There are a further 7 optional puzzles (one for each chapter). Of course, the puzzles gradually become more complex the further one gets.
The puzzles involve movable and fixed items, like power boxes, power spheres, pressure plates, switches, electromagnets, laser bridges, cameras and small operable machines. The game is primarily in first person, but through controlling said cameras and machines the view switches away from the main character to help you perform your task.
The game is about more than just puzzles though. It does follow a story and at the very heart of this is the issue of morality and the making of life and death decisions. Can a machine think? Can AI be sentient, or have feelings as humans do? Could AI reach the point where these things are possible and even be indistinguishable from humans? Can one trust machines to control our lives? As entities unhindered by emotion and sentiment, and programmed to be blatantly logical, can AI be trusted to decide on our behalf on what is right and what is wrong, even what is best for mankind? In this regard the ending of the game was quite compelling.
I was impressed.

Review from Steam

The Portal without portals and with moral dilemmas. Story reminded me The Soma and The Apsulov.
Short and not so difficult.

Review from Steam

Going by the philosophical excursions of this game and the antagonistic AI, it feels like it was trying to follow into the footsteps of the Talos Principle and Portal 2 which is already a tall order, however it really fell short of that ambition. The puzzles were way too simple and short, even the optional ones. Unlike in Talos or Portal the tests basically served no purpose to the story; trying to shoehorn them into the plot might have been a huge limiting factor. It certainly had the potential for more challenging puzzles, and other secrets that could have been hidden in or behind the many objects that you could pick up and turn around (though when I repeatedly fell through the map in an elevator stage, I could read some kind of red message "put in the actual half lifts" from below - does that count as an easter egg?)...
Nevertheless, all in all I did enjoy this fun and short game, which can be completed 100% within 4-6 hours. Best to buy it on sale or in a bundle, else I can imagine some may end up slightly disappointed.

Review from Steam

The interactions between Eva and TOM reminds me so much of Portal, you can consider it as a good alternative of the former as you wait for the sequel that probably won't exist, ever
The Turing Test is a must buy for puzzle games fans, albeit being generally easy as my stupid ass can solve almost all of the puzzles without wasting too much time. You can also come back via chapter select to finish the optional puzzles that are harder to solve.
It also has a nice story, you're tasked with investigating what happened to the ground team in icy moon Europa, and finally given the morally ambiguous choices in the epilogue.
The ending is good, although I can't help but feel that it's a bit underwhelming. I wish it has an extended closure of what will happen after what you did in the end.
TL;DR: The Turing Test is an underrated puzzle game, and I have good time playing it