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Rise of Industry

Rise of Industry is a strategic tycoon game where you build and manage your growing industrial empire in a living, breathing, and procedurally generated world set in the 1930s that is constantly evolving and adapting to your playstyle. As a budding entrepreneur, you will build factories, construct efficient production lines, move raw materials, produce finished goods, and arrange trade with the world's developing cities, providing them with the resources they need to flourish - for as they grow and prosper, so do you. However, it won’t always be a smooth ride to magnate status. Random business events and stock auctions will keep you on your toes, all while A.I. rivals compete for market share and look for ways to grow and exploit enemy weaknesses - beware of the hostile takeover. Designed with an eye towards both accessibility and depth, Rise of Industry has enough strategic complexity and replayability to satisfy the most experienced fans of the genre, while its simple-to-understand mechanics ensure that new players will love it as well. Experience tailored for every player - Specialise in just trading, production, gathering or any combination and research your way to bigger and better things. Bid for PR contracts to get the upper-hand on your rivals.
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

Reading the negative reviews, I feel like people went into this game expecting a prettier, more modern OpenTTD when RoI is 100% not that. The game is completely different in how it works and how it plays. The only similarity between OpenTTD and RoI, apart from the fact that they are both transport simulators, is that they both require extensive effort to learn how to play the game and play well. Balancing supply chains and advancing your crafting capabilities all while staving off competition is actually quite fun and rewarding in a different way than OpenTTD generally feels. The reality of RoI is that it is really an automation game disguised as a transport tycoon wannabe, and that has clearly thrown some other players for a loop. If you don't want to put the time in to actually learn how to play the game, RoI is likely not for you. If you like games like OpenTTD, Factorio, Satisfactory, or ECO and you enjoy reading wikis for fun, then RoI might be of interest to you. The game is beautiful and the gameplay is engaging albeit a bit repetitive. Certainly an interesting title for the right kind of player.

Review from Steam

Pro:
- the graphic is charming compared to games like Capitalism 2
- supply chain management system is challenging and interesting, similar to Banished, Anno series, Settlers series etc.
- profit margin is thin, vehicle and building upkeep are high for any tier 0 short distance business, which makes it more challenging (took me 10 repeats to understand the economics of tier 0 and tier 1 production in profitable manner - basically if you expand without checking if your business is profitable, you will go broke very quickly)
- progressive tech: you start with simple resource collection business (tier 0), to simple farms (tier 0.5), to simple factories (tier 1) to more complex factories (2 and 3), then you have to manage polutions, logistics (warehouse, train system etc), to finally making your own "Car" (the equivalent of going to Mars in Civilisation or humankind)
- static system makes it hard NOT to make profit once you know the keys to success: only make what is demanded by the limited # of shops in the city, to the amount that is demanded, and only build your production so close (<20 tiles) that the vehicle upkeep does not drive you to bankruptcy.
Con:
Because it models supply chain with trucks and trains in details, it cannot go to the wide complexity that series like Capitalism can achieve with their abstractions.
>No private labelling, no retail system, no export import, no dynamic market demand, no dynamic stock market.
>No competition, every city/region is a monopoly by winning the auction for building right in that region - I think this is because the margin is so thin that 2 companies in same city will mean both parties loses money, and the market demand is not dynamic (i.e. if it costs EVERY producers $20 to make a product, the market price should be more than $20)
> Just simple loans and paying back loans is all you can do in financial system. Buying opponent's stocks give you no dividend, just driving them to bankruptcy so you can destroy all their buildings and take over their cities. There is no balance sheet and profit and loss statement
Conclusion:
> Buy on sale. The game has gone through 4 years of early access so it is very stable and balanced at the moment. Unfortunately it achieved it by removing all possible competitive and dynamic market system in the game. So if you want relaxing game that does not require much brainpower (just some trial and error) to figure out. This is the game for you. This game is similar to Banished in that it is challenging to know the secret of success, but once you figure it out, all you can do is repeat it over and over again. Yes you can make wheat farm instead of grapes orchard (similar to how you can do hunting and fishing instead of farming in banished), but it does not change the fundamental to profit: static monopoly, limited static demand, short range supplies.

Review from Steam

This game is hard to grade on Steam's dichotomous grading system. Is it a great game? No. If you ask me an open question like "Please recommend me a game" this would not be on the top of my mind. But if you ask me "Can you recommend Rise of Industry", I would probably say yes.
The game did grow on me, and I kept coming back to it. The tech tree sets it apart from other tycoon games, and as there are no farms or factories on the map when the game begins (you have to build them yourself when you have the tech) you have to make tactical decisions as to which tech paths you should focus on to get the most out of what you can produce in your region, as not all resources are available in all regions, and you have to purchase rights to be able to build other things than one warehouse in a region.
However, after one play through of the campaign mode (30 hours) I feel like I will probably move on to other games.

Review from Steam

I bought it on sale for ~6€, for that price this is a good game. I would not recommend paying full price for it.
The core gameplay loop is entertaining if a bit long-winded (I would find myself leaving the game run in fast forward mode while making tea a number of times). A game with a single AI opponent on easy mode took me about 4 hours, though that may of course change with more experience. I generally like that buying out all your opponent's shares does not immediately end the game and you can continue expanding your own factory network, however I found myself quitting rather quickly afterwards.
I would also like to see more options for logistic setups in warehouses such as "demand x amount of goods from other warehouses per month" and differentiating between supplying and requesting warehouses. Factorio's logistic chest system is a good example I believe.
There are a number of quite annoying flaws, to which I have not been able to find a solution, such as the rails being really finicky to set up (a number of times warehouses would report that no path could be found for a delivery although the path was visually there. Setting up a second junction usually worked, so I assume this may be an issue of poor visual representation rather than pathfinding). I also found myself quite frustrated with the placement of diagonal rails over hills and in junctions. While it does make sense to have a distinct placement system for rails and roads, setting up rails really just annoyed me here. Especially because setting up double rails tended to end up looking quite ugly without extensive terraforming.
Performance started degrading rapidly for me in mid and late game, especially when running in x4 fast forward mode the game rarely got more than 30 FPS @1440p on decent hardware.

Review from Steam

Rise of Industry is an automation and logistics management game. A good game for having in the background whilst doing other tasks or watching media, it may become boring if that option is not available. I found the game had a lot of downtime either waiting for money, waiting for factories to finish crafting or waiting for research to complete.
Tutorial had 72 pages of instructions which was incredibly overwhelming. It wasn’t always clear what the instructions actually wanted me to do and some of the instructions actually covered up parts of the map I was supposed to interact with after I scaled up the UI. It made the game come across as complicated but honestly, it’s much more simple than it first appears - gather resources, sell & send to factories to create more expensive goods, repeat. Admittedly I still had difficulty navigating the UI and I wanted more notifications to be interactable. My dream of becoming an aggressive monopolistic billionaire was also squashed because I couldn’t figure out how to buy land permits from other companies.
There is a wide flexibility with the game's settings (difficulty, map size, terrain, pollution, etc) but on the whole the mechanics come across as very shallow. As far as I could tell, you can’t set your own prices, there seems to be an endless supply of workers to man your factories and factories are ready to go the moment you place them.
There are events (for example - workers strikes or mine collapses) which cause debuffs over the entire production. I wanted to interact with those events more (sending resources or negotiating with the workers) but there’s no option for that - there is some timed preventative distribution though. One of the events I had asked me to complete a piece of research after I had already completed all the research, that was interesting.
The achievements are a bit all over the place. Quite a few have inaccurate descriptions, at least one popped before it should have and one didn’t pop until after I had closed and reopened the game. ‘Freelander’ (complete 50 contracts across all playthroughs) and ‘Hard Working’ (Place 1,000 Buildings across all playthroughs) are seemingly notorious for resetting if you close the game - because of this I left my computer unattended for quite some time with the game running. You can easily removed about 10 hours of my playtime to get a more accurate count, probably more.
The DLC, Rise of Industry:2130, initially comes across as a post-apocalyptic reskin rather than a fully fledged game in its own right but there are some subtle mechanic introductions regarding pollution that actually make it quite interesting - more so than the main game.

Review from Steam

I think I've tried this game back in 2019 or so, but didn't like it so I refunded it. But now I've come around to playing it again and for some reason it clicked with me. It's very fun. It's as tedious as you want it to be. You can do everyting manually, or automize the bulk of the set-up stuff. The AI is not really an opponent and more a little speedbump. The map editor is not so good and making a mod is a pain :D
But the game itself if very good for what it does. I like it.

Review from Steam

Very addictive game. The first 2 times I tried starting up the career mode, I went bankrupt in minutes. I was about to return the game because I was so frustrated but I decided let's try one more time... and as they say, third time's a charm. I finally figured out how to get going and now I'm a titan of industry. I feel like an actual CEO making decisions about how to allocate resources, what contracts to take, what new industries to get into, etc. Very well designed game.