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Homefront: The Revolution

Philadelphia - once the birthplace of Independence - has become a ghetto, where surveillance drones and armoured patrols keep the population at heel, crushing any dissent with savage force. Her once-proud citizens live in a police state, forced to collaborate just to survive, their dreams of freedom long since extinguished. But in the badlands of the Red Zone, in the bombed out streets and abandoned subways, a Resistance is forming. A guerrilla force, determined to fight for their freedoms despite overwhelming odds and ignite the second American Revolution.
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

I bought this for TimeSplitters 2: HD Remaster! Was not disappointed!

Review from Steam

TimeSplitters 2 is a goated classic, idk why you have this whole homefront thing packed with it though

Review from Steam

I bought this just for Time Splitters 2 on PC

Review from Steam

So glad they included a free game with Timesplitters 2

Review from Steam

I haven't experienced this game on release so I can't comment on that, but we live in an age when patches can actually change the game for the better (or worse). And in it's current state, Homefront: The Revolution seems highly underrated for what it is and what it accomplishes.
This game is a sequel to 2011's Homefront, a game which is regarded as medicore and forgettable. This game is only a sequel in name and the story does not connect with the previous title. Also, the story for this game itself is pretty mediocre with bland and unmemorable characters and is kind of what you'd expect for the game (Country is being invaded by a foreign superpower, let's try and take it back) so I won't really get into that.
Gameplay wise, it can be compared to the later Far Cry games: do some story missions, capture territory, do side missions, buy weapons and upgrades, etc. but there are certainly differences, especially in the "Yellow Zone" territories where stealth is more important. There is also a pretty interesting weapon customization system where you can change your weapon to an alternative weapon at any time (for example the crossbow can be changed to a flamethrower or a shotgun). The territory capture mechanic is also more interesting than in other games. Yes, there are some outposts that can be captured by killing all the enemies in the area, but many of them will have you figuring out a puzzle, doing some platforming on rooftops or finding and collecting items.
While the "America gets conquered by a foreign power" is not an unique concept, it is executed pretty well in this game. The areas you visit are varied and atmospheric, ranging from abandoned toxic ruins to well maintained districts where collaborators live in luxurious apartments amongst skyscrapers or a prison district where the undesirables are kept. The atmosphere is pretty similar to Half-Life 2, Freedom Fighters and even Metro 2033 in some cases.

The game has two types of zones which are "Yellow Zones" and "Red Zones"
Red Zones: These are all out open-world urban guerrilla warfare with Far Cry like elements (although smaller more hand crafted maps with less map marker overload). In these zones you are directly going head to head against the North Korean occupation forces in all out combat. The North Koreans (Or Norks as the game calls them) have superior tech, drones, scanning devices, armored vehicles, etc.
On the higher difficulties, you definitely have to use hit-and-run tactics which makes the whole "resistance fighter" thing feel real. What is super impressive about these zones are the amount of open buildings you can enter and explore/loot/use as cover or snipers nests/etc. I would say probably 90% of the ruined and bombed out buildings are enterable which is crazy. They are all very handcrafted looking as well. Some might be more simple points of interests such as abandoned apartments and stores with a few lootable scraps, and others might be full fledged enemy compounds you can take over and turn into resistance outposts.
Yellow Zones: These zones are very "Deus Ex" style hub zones. Super detailed, and slightly cyberpunk, with high security and KPA presence. Your objective here is to sneak around and sabotage the different enemy outposts and patrols until you increase the "hearts and minds" of the people living in these slums. Once increased, you can kick off what is essentially an insurrection, which then turns the zone into an all out combat area you have to fight through. You can play these zones in pretty much any style, and complete the objectives in any order you want.
I was surprised how these zones almost "out Deux Ex'd" the Deus Ex hub cities in terms of detail and exploration factor.
My favorite thing about this game is the gun customization: Most guns can be completely transformed into two other variations. For example, the pistol can be converted to an SMG or silent steel dart launcher, the rifle can be changed into an LMG or mine launcher. On top of the conversion kits you can buy, you can also buy attachments like scopes with different zoom levels, laser sights, bipods, among others. All of these customizations can be applied out in the field (including the complete conversion kits) with a Crysis like customization menu/system. This mechanic definitely helps convey the feeling of a battle-hardened guerrilla fighter desperate to fight against the oppressors by any means necessary as shown with the makeshift and ramshackle appearances of these weapons and their conversions.
Lastly, the bad things. The gameplay can get monotonous after a while, and the side objectives can be boring and tedious. Some side objectives can also be impossible because enemies stop spawning in areas that you completely conquered. The character animations (both player and NPC) can look janky, and the "parkour" is pretty rough around the edges. Both the friendly and enemy AI can act seriously brain-dead sometimes, but there's nothing that we haven't seen in other open world games. The most annoying thing is the weird spawn/despawn system for enemy group/patrols. A few times enemies spawned right next to me, while other times I tried go around a building to get behind a parked jeep and it despawned when I got there. Those flying drones also sometimes despawn right in front of the player for some reason. There are also many cases of of objects floating in mid-air, and effects not disappearing, for example the light-cones from flashlights and the electric effects from the Heavy Troopers persist even after the dead bodies disappear.
In conclusion, this game could have been so much more if it had a higher budget and a bit of polish, but all-in-all despite the wonkiness and ocassional bugs I've found it an enjoyable and memorable experience, with an intricate and atmospheric setting.

Review from Steam

Only got this for TimeSplitters 2 lol
For the unknowing:

Review from Steam

I've got no interest in Homefront: The Revolution itself, but it contains a pretty good port of Timesplitters 2 (with mouse support rather than the absurd control scheme the original version has). Make sure to install the TS2 Redux mod to unlock access to all of the features.