ADR1FT Screenshot 1
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ADR1FT

ADR1FT is an immersive First Person Experience (FPX) that tells the story of an astronaut in peril. Floating silently amongst the wreckage of a destroyed space station with no memory and a severely damaged EVA suit slowly leaking oxygen, the only survivor struggles to determine the cause of the catastrophic event that took the lives of everyone on board.The player fights to stay alive by exploring the wreckage for precious resources, and overcomes the challenges of an unforgiving environment to repair the damaged EEV and safely return home.
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Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

The premise of ADR1FT is, that you wake up in a space suit in earth's orbit with the space station that you were working on, almost completely destroyed around you. You don't know what happened, but you have to try to get back to earth safely. Of course, that's not all about the story of this game, since there are some intruiging things getting revealed over the course of the playthrough. As in most cases, there's more to find out and some of it is quite surprising...
Wow, am I torn about this game... Played through it in one sitting and I have really mixed feelings about it. ADR1FT looks absolutely amazing, even if it is already 5 years old as of the writing of this review. The devs really captured the feel of being alone in space and the devastating situation of the protagonist really comes across well.
Then there's the gameplay... Essentially, without spoiling anything, you navigate around the partly destroyed space station, trying to get systems up and running again so that you can escape back to earth. Problem is, that you do the exact same things multiple times without any kind of variety really. What makes things worse is that you're constantly running out of oxygen, so you're always chasing O2 bottles that are floating around pretty much everywhere. This can become very old very fast, unfortunately.
What did really bug me is the fact that the protagonist doesn't say pretty much anything the whole game. You would think that in this situation, you would try to contact someone via radio, or at least speak to yourself to bolster your sanity. But no, she doesn't say anything. Pretty disappointing.
On the technical side of things, I didn't experience any problems at all. No bugs, no glitches, no crashes, no frame drops. The whole game seems very polished. I did not play this in VR, so I can't comment on that mode.
With 4-5 hours for one playthrough, it's not a long game by any means, but with the type of content it provides gameplay wise, it's still close to overstaying its welcome. The length would feel just right if the story was fleshed out a bit more (more conversations, radio calls, speaking protagonist etc.).
Well, how can I rate this game? Gameplay is thin. The story, while intruiging, lacks in execution. Still, I find the experience the game provides to be something you don't get every day. And for that reason alone, I think ADR1FT is worth a playthrough.

Review from Steam

i left the game running by accident thats why i have 24 hours
its pretty good, the graphics are nice
i like the physics too ig

Review from Steam

I am updating my review as I was very unfair in my first review having reviewed the game after playing for less than an hour. I have now played for quite a few hours and have totally changed my opinion of the game.
Graphics: Fantastic. I am playing on an HTC Vive Cosmos Elite and the graphics are pretty superb for a VR game.
Atmosphere: The setting of the game is great. The station you are on is really believable and well designed.
Controls: It took me a while to get used to the controls. at first I really didn't like that you are not actually in control of the astronauts arms. Your controllers basically control your propulsion system and by raising your arms to point in front of you causes the astronaut to reach out for objects in front of her that can be interacted with.
Negatives: The one thing I still find annoying about the controls is that when you are floating through space, the astronaut you are playing will automatically turn to face any oxygen canisters that you happen to be near. She will do this whether you are in need of oxygen or not and you cannot turn away from the oxygen canister until you float far enough away from it.
Besides that one negative, I would now highly recommend this game just for the experience of floating in space above the Earth.

Review from Steam

This is a nice and short game with very good visuals !
unfortunately the tasks are too monotonous ..
I liked it but I didn't expect that moving in the vacuum of the cosmos is so difficult ;)

Review from Steam

Chilled and slow-paced space adventure. I enjoyed the backstory and the visuals. Controls felt good and I haven't noticed any glitches.
Now a handful of things I consider could use improvement:
- fetch quest to prepare EEV could be more creative
- pushing things away hardly ever worked for me, probably poor distance judgement. I would like to see use of hands to soften a wall hit
- sometimes I felt like I'm playing as an elephant - getting hit damage from walking through the door, hitting obstacles that seemed far away

Review from Steam

A pretty fun single-play exploration game. I wouldn't even call it a puzzle, because while you complete objectives there's not much thinking past just "find that thing".
Speaking of finding things, this game has a big playability flaw around finding objectives. You have a short range scanner which is VERY helpful, but it's quite limited in range. When you need to find something and you don't know where it is on the ginormous map, you're supposed to rely on the radar in the bottom left. Trick is, that radar is TERRIBLE to grok. There are a lot of dots on it at any given point, and nothing clearly stands out as your main objective. There are arrows that either point off the side somewhere (like, behind you), but when you get them in front of you they only point left or right, and never let the object they're tracking get into the radar view. I must just not get it. But even that... there's just nothing here to help you make sense of it.
The other big flaw is super annoying. In VR you can point a controller at an item to "focus" Alex on it. This turns her and rolls her, &c. to get her lined up to pick it up. This seems pretty helpful for getting good proximity to the item for catching it, but it comes with the big downside of also activating when you're not expecting it. That means you'll be cruising through a weird room or corridor, thinking you're awesome for finally getting the hang of 6 degrees of freedom controls, and BAM, you're all of a sudden spiraling off to the left, accidentally chasing a thing you had no idea was there. Recovering from such a surprise before taking damage from hitting a wall can be very difficult. I definitely took more damage this way than from running into debris.
One other tiny nit-pick: not all controls leave you coasting infinitely like they would in space. For example, your main forward/back/left/right thrust just require one good push and you can coast across a kilometer of space, but if you roll you'll stop rotating after a couple seconds. I'm guessing that was just a decision made in gameplay testing, but TBH the challenge of this game is getting good with spatial controls.
I also think I would have rather not had the view re-center if I turn my head too far to the side. I'd rather just see the inside of my space helmet than get the jarring experience of having it recenter and then have to go through the trouble of re-re-centering. That's probably just my preference though.
All said, I still enjoyed this game, and while I wouldn't play it again I would recommend you give it a shot. It's a fun time coasting around, and the map design is gorgeous.