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A House of Many Doors

Welcome to the House. You are not welcome. Explore the House, a parasite dimension that steals from other worlds, in a train that scuttles on mechanical legs. Uncover secrets. Open locked doors. Lead a crew of dysfunctional characters. Write procedurally-generated poems. Fight in turn-based combat. Explore a strange new setting, dripping with atmosphere, crusted with lore. Escape. Escape. Escape. You are an explorer, poet and spy, launching yourself into the unknown in search of adventure. Rig an election in the city of the dead. Visit a village lit by the burning corpse of a god (careful not to inhale the holy smoke). Sell your teeth to skittering spider-things for a moment in their library. Over 90 bizarre locations await discovery in the dust and the dark.
Promote for 50G

Game Discussion

Review by Anonymous
Review from Steam

A friend of mine had a spare key so I got this game for free.
I really recommend it! It's a narrative heavy game in the style of Fallen London/Sunless Sea, though with its own take. I enjoyed reading it, it made me laugh at times - especially the romance options. I think I managed all the options on the store page (and more!) except for 'Men' somehow, despite relentlessly flirting with literally anybody/thing I could. It's great, you can do wacky things and just see what happens!
There are a few downsides. Similar to Sunless Sea, you've got long stretches of travelling between places without much gameplay happening. There are combat encounters between the narrative bits, which are like a very primitive FTL, but they're rarely worth the risk so most of your travelling time is spent skirting the enemies. I tended to just watch Youtube videos while travelling (fortunately you can fairly easily get a lot of an item that lets you teleport between SOME cities (unsure on why the ones you can teleport to are as such but never mind). There are also some bugs and definitely a few minor UI issues, like keeping track of your stats and quests - it's fine but could definitely be better!
Nevertheless, it's a good quiet game to play to get some fun reading with light gameplay/combat in between, I got al ot of time out of it and while I got to the end, I think I could easily go back and get a lot more time in it as there are so many quests/companions I haven't explored/flirted with yet.
Definitely worth the price!

Review from Steam

Definitely a buggy game, and a bit slow, but some of the best worldbuilding and best writing I've seen in a game for a long time.

Review from Steam

I honestly think this is better than sunless skies, I love the world that it created and the story it built, smart and filled with depth while being clear enough to actually progress through without selling your life to the game.

Review from Steam

I love this game. The writing is truly phenomenal. The art and soundtrack are stunning. The general attention to detail in this game is uncanny. With as long as I've played it, I've only done one ending, though I've seen bits and pieces of others, and every time I start perusing the forums/wiki for this game, I find new tidbits of info that make me so excited to keep playing. It's a deeply intriguing game, and I love trying to solve it's mysteries.
A lot of reviews complain about HOMD being a rip-off of Sunless Seas, and to some degree, it is, but that's because Harry Tuffs has worked with the team behind Fallen London/Sunless Seas/Sunless Skies, and iirc has written for at least some of those games as well. HOMD, however, is entirely Harry Tuffs's story, and honestly, I'd say it's all the better for it. If you're interested in Sunless Seas and similar games for the writing and exploration, HOMD will delight you. However, if you like the Sunless Seas genre because of the resource management, HOMD isn't the game for you. I personally enjoy HOMD far more than its Fallen London universe counterparts because I find Sunless Seas/Skies too difficult. HOMD is just the right difficulty of resource management to ensure you need some sort of strategy as you explore without impeding your exploration progress. Think a DND campaign: the goal is to challenge players just enough that there's a sense of accomplishment when they succeed, but if you're constantly having to reroll new characters because of deaths, things get frustrating. However, if you're expecting the higher stakes of Sunless Seas, you're going to be disappointed by the relative ease of HOMD.
All of that being said, the game does have bugs. Most of the game-breaking bugs were fixed in the initial patch after release, but there's a few that persist, especially in some of the more rare encounters of the game, or under unique blends of circumstances. If I had to fault Harry Tuffs for anything with HOMD it is that he seemingly so thoroughly exhausted himself with the completion of this game that it appears he's not going to return to it to update or expand upon it, which is really unfortunate. Rarely, if ever, will you find a bug that's truly game-breaking, but there are some that require resets/loading saves. I'll admit that over the course of loosely following the development of the wiki for this game, occasionally there are certain "bugs" that turn out to actually be intentionally difficult bits of gameplay. I hope that as HOMD's fanbase continues to comb through the mysteries of this lovely little puzzle of a game that some things clear up a bit more.
Overall, I would absolutely recommend this game. Its story alone is worth the money. If I could buy HOMD as a novel in a bookstore, I would. But it's the gameplay, the randomization and player choice, and the depth of mystery and lore that really give this game its replayability. Each ending is certainly self-contained, and you can play this game once and be satisfied, but every time you replay it you'll find new hidden gems of story that slowly add to the bigger picture. All in all, it's wonderfully well-crafted, if a bit clunky in some of the mechanics.

Review from Steam

The lack of attention this game has earned is simply criminal.

Review from Steam

A House of Many Doors is a game that incorporates vivid storytelling via text with periods of top-down travel in your "kinetopede" to new locations. You're a poet/journalist on an adventure to break out or escape "The House".
I put off finishing this game for about a month because I really didn't want it to end. I did the final quest today, there are alternate decisions you can make to finalize your play through. I have never played a game before with such creative and captive writing. It was so fun to read through the quests and location descriptions within "The House". There's combat to the likes of FTL but it can be avoided nearly 100% of the time if you rather explore than fight. I would highly recommend this game to anyone who enjoys reading and dark fantasy.

Review from Steam

It's a little bit less polished than the sunless franchise, and much more focused on a linear story line, but the story itself is still great, and the plots you get wrapped up in are engaging. The travel using the train can be somewhat meh - there's a lot of repetition of the sorts of events you encounter while exploring, and there aren't too many of them, but I would still recommend it on the basis of the story if you can get past that.